External research

Prevalence Data

Smoking, drinking and drug use among young people in England in 2013
Health and Social Care Information Centre, 2014
VSA continues to be the most commonly used drug among 11-13 year-olds and second only to cannabis by the age of 15.
(See earlier reports: 2012, 2011, 2010)

Crime in England and Wales, 2009/10
Home Office, July 2010
There are twice as many adult VS-users in the UK as heroin-users. (NB: VSA information was omitted from subsequent surveys).

The 2011 ESPAD Report
The European School Survey Project on Alcohol and Other Drugs, May 2012
9% of 15–16 year-old European students have used inhalants within their lifetime. The figure is 10% in the UK.
(See earlier reports: 2007, 2003, 1999, all)

Mortality Data

Trends in Death Associated with Abuse of Volatile Substances, 1971-2009
St George’s, University of London, 2012
“Volatile substance abuse remains an important problem in the UK, especially in terms of causing premature death amongst young people.”
(See earlier reports: 1971-2008, 1971-2007)

Drug related deaths involving volatile substances and nitrous oxide in England and Wales, 1993–2013
Office for National Statistics (ONS), 2014

Drug-related deaths in the UK: January – December 2012
np-SAD, ICDP, St George’s, University of London, 2013

Treatment Data

Drug Statistics from the National Drug Treatment Monitoring System: 1 April 2013 to 31 March 2014
Public Health England, 2014
100 clients aged 18 or over are in treatment for solvents as their primary drug use.
(See earlier reports: 2012-2013, 2011-2012, 2010-2011, all)

Young people’s statistics from the National Drug Treatment Monitoring System (NDTMS): 1 April 2013 to 31 March 2014
Public Health England, 2014
134 young people are in treatment for solvents as their primary drug use and 160 for secondary use. The median age is 14 (younger than for any other drug, including NPS).
(See earlier reports: 2012-2013, 2011-2012, 2010-2011, all)

Policy

The New Psychoactive Substances Act, 2015
Home Office, 2015
The documents relating to New Psychoactive Substances Act and draft Bill.

New psychoactive substances. Protecting and improving the nation’s health
Public Health England, 2014
A toolkit for substance misuse commissioners.

New Psychoactive Substances Review: Report of the Expert Panel
Home Office, 2014

New Psychoactive Substances in England: A review of the evidence
Home Office, 2014

New Psychoactive Substances (NPS): Resource pack for informal educators and practitioners
Home Office, 2015 

‘Out of Sight? … not out of mind’: Children, Young People and Volatile Substance Abuse
DH, HO, DFeS, 2005
A Framework for VSA.

Prevention

Briefing papers from Mentor UK

Social and Emotional Learning
Early Intervention Foundation, 2015
The first publication from the Early Intervention Foundation on the importance of social and emotional skills.

Preventing drug use among children and adolescents
National Institute on Drug Abuse, 2015
A research-based guide for parents, educators and community leaders.

Other Related Research

ACMD Advice on Nitrous Oxide
March, 2015

GDS 2015 Findings: Nitrous Oxide
Global Drug Survey, 2015
“The world’s largest study of nitrous oxide use ever conducted” including harm reduction recommendations.

Not for Human Consumption
DrugScope, 2015
An updated and amended status report on new psychoactive substances (NPS) and ‘club drugs’ in the UK.

Business As Usual
DrugScope on behalf of the Recovery Partnership, 2014
A status report on new psychoactive substances (NPS) and ‘club drugs’ in the UK.

Could excessive use of aerosols in a confined space result in exposure to lethal levels of butane?
TICTAC Communications Ltd, St George’s – University of London and the British Aerosol Manufacturers’ Association, 2009
“Despite extensive research, calculation and practical testing, we were not able to reproduce conditions which could lead to harmful or fatal effects from excessive spraying of aerosol products in a confined space. However there is no information available regarding the possibility of specific individual hypersensitivity to high concentrations of butane. There may be a significant risk of fire or even explosion if high concentrations of butane are allowed to accumulate. It is wise to always read and follow the manufacturers instructions printed on the product.”

More Information

Re-Solv maintains a comprehensive library of VSA publications, research and resources. If you have questions, please don’t hesitate to contact us.

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